Previous Exhibitions

Here, you'll find information about our exhibitions from past years. To inquire about exhibitions prior to 2014, please contact Rosewood Gallery at 937-296-0294 or email tracy.flagg@ketteringoh.org.

 

Jeremy Long
HWD
Michelle Bon Durant

2017 Exhibitions

travers
Frank Travers, “Tick Infested Moose,” woodcut, 38 x 22 in.

Frank Travers, What Remains
July 17 – August 18
Reception: Thursday, July 20, 6-8pm

Printmaker Frank Travers, who also lives and works in Dayton, will exhibit a series of works titled What Remains. Of his work, Travers says, “I’m very interested in the details and the things that get a little gross; puss, guts, worms that live in guts and other parasitic activity. I think we all know fragility of the body and become more aware of it the older we get. I want to show through my pictures a stagnant decay that is also a sort of narrative perspective that is metaphysical but also recognizable.”

Travers has exhibited widely both locally and nationally. He earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in 2010 from the University of Connecticut and a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 2008 from Wright State University. Travers currently serves as Adjunct Professor of Printmaking at Stivers School for the Arts in Dayton as well as Adjunct Professor of Humanities at Edison Community College in Piqua and volunteers at Blue House Gallery and Studios in Dayton.

arnold
Nicholaus Arnold, “No One Was Having a Good Time,” 2015, found and hand-made paper bag installation, dim. var.

Nicholaus Arnold, No One Was Having a Very Good Time
July 17 – August 18
Reception: Thursday, July 20, 6-8pm

Both the receptions and exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Dayton artist Nicholaus Arnold’s studio work, usually humorous and seemingly lackadaisical in nature, takes a more solemn turn in this exhibition titled No One Was Having a Very Good Time. This series of found object and hand crafted works is the culmination of Arnold’s response to several months spent caring for, and ultimately saying goodbye to, his elderly grandfather. “The objects together summarize the experiences and confusion of what I was going through during the care of my grandpa, and lend a sense of approachability to the situation,” Arnold says of this series. “The works themselves are created with a sense of analysis and depress emotions to allow the viewer to interpret the complicated nature of a death of a close family member.”

Arnold, who has exhibited his artwork extensively in Dayton and the surrounding areas as well as nation-wide, holds a Master of Fine Arts degree in printmaking  from Syracuse University, a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, also in printmaking from Wright State University, and an Associate of Arts degree in fine art photography from Sinclair Community College. He currently serves as Adjunct Instructor of Printmaking and Photography at the University of Dayton and is a founder of Blue House Gallery and Studios in Dayton.

23rd Annual The View Juried Landscape Exhibition

May 30 – July 7
Reception, Thursday, June 1, 6 – 8pm
The View is Rosewood Gallery’s annual, juried group landscape exhibition. All media are considered, and the artwork exhibited deals with outdoor themes, land imagery, the environment or world issues. Admission is free. Check out a recent review by Pamela Dillon of the Dayton Daily News.
This a juried exhibition for artists living in Ohio.  This year, 82 artists submitted 238 pieces, Simsfrom which the juror, Andrea Benedict Starkey, chose 47 artworks representing 37 artists. Starkey also selected the winners of awards totaling $1,100.Participating artists include George Armstrong, Beautiful Kilometer, DJ Berard, Patricia Boone, Douglas Brand, Virginia Burroughs, Bruce Campbell, Anita Dawson, Amy Deal, Phillip Erbaugh, Winifred Fiedler, Douglas Fiely, Bill Franz, Doug Harlow, Don Henry, David E. Horton, Martin Hunter, Kelly Joslin, Richard Jurus, Mary Baker Koch, Sean Leavell, Craig Lloyd, Richard Malogorski, Tracy McElfresh, Kevin McNeeley, Kathy A. Moore, Carroll Schleppi, Donald A. Schuster, Patrick Sims, Andy Snow, Gina Stevenson, David Stichweh, Barb Weinert-McBee, Mary Beth Whitley, Don Williams, Ronald Wilson, and Margaret E. Wittmer.Hours for the exhibition are:
Monday – Thursday 9 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Rosewood Gallery is sponsored by the City of Kettering Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Department, with support from the Kettering Arts Council and the Ohio Arts Council. The Gallery is located in the Rosewood Arts Centre, 2655 Olson Drive in Kettering. For more information, call (937) 296-0294 or visit our website: playkettering.org/gallery.

Image: Patrick Sims, Crossing North Fork, 2017, acrylic, 10 x 20 in.

Emily Moores, Cathedral

April 17 – May 19, 2017

 Reception Thursday, April 20, 6-8pm

Cincinnati-based paper artist Emily Moores presented a site-specific installation called Cathedral. Regarding her work, Moores says, “I cut, fold, and roll to transform paper into dense textures or towering structures. By hand cutting each shape, the repetition within the forms is not identical. The slight variation adds a tactile quality to the paper structures.” She continues, “I use the limited nature of installation combined with the sensory experience of my ornamental paper constructions to focus attention on the present moment in time.”

Moores earned a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning (DAAP), and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Cleveland Institute of Art. She currently serves as Development Coordinator at Churches Active in Northside, a Cincinnati-area food pantry.

Darren Haper, Cyclops Dot to Dot

April 17 – May 19 , 2017

Painter Darren Haper, who lives and works in Dayton, exhibited a dynamic series of paintings in an exhibition titled Almost There. “I am interested in that time of life when innocence, freedom of ideas, and inspirations came naturally—a time before one knew what composition, line, texture, or color theory meant,” Haper says. “Much of my inspiration comes from watching the free flow of ideas my children express as they create art and wishing I could achieve that again.”

Haper, who has exhibited his artwork extensively in the Dayton area as well as in national and international exhibitions, holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Painting from Miami University. He has given lectures at several of the region’s universities and was the recipient of the 2007 MCACD Fellowship. Haper currently serves as Studio Manager at Mike Elsass Studios.

Heather Lea Reid, Intersubjective Indulgence

March 6 – April 7, 2017

Reception Thursday, March 9, 6-8pm

Painter Heather Lea Reid, who lives and works in Dayton, exhibited a series of works collectively titled Intersubjective Indulgence. Of her work, Reid says, “I start from drawings and ideas derived from everyday experiences. Instead of revealing a narrative though, I relate an overall mood that encompasses the heart of an experience. In turn, my drawings build into detailed paintings that express the depth of daily experience. I am compelled to communicate something that I cannot express in words. Instead, I communicate my thoughts and feelings with the use of line, color, and form.”

Cynthia Gregory, The Poet’s Desk

March 6 – April 7, 2017

Reception Thursday, March 9, 6-8pm

Kentucky-based artist Cynthia Gregory, whose studio work integrates drawing, sculpture, and furniture-making to illuminate themes of time, history, accumulation, and containment, exhibited a body of work titled The Poet’s Desk. “A significant source of inspiration fueling my work rests in my interests in literature, writing, history, the natural sciences, and astronomy,” Gregory says of her process. “From these themes and sources, I choose subject matter that builds a personal vocabulary of recurring motifs, such as the experiential, tactile world of the everyday, as well as elements found in humanistic spaces of contemplation, knowledge, creation, and wonder—for instance, the stratified clutter of a poet’s desk, star charts draped over an astronomer’s table, or enigmatic objects, talismans, and scraps of paper lodged along a scholar’s bookshelf.”

Gregory, who has exhibited her artwork widely in national and international exhibitions and whose work is featured in various publications, holds several degrees including a BA in English (Northern Kentucky University), a BFA in Fine Art (College of Mount St. Joseph), an MLS (Indiana University), and an MFA (University of Cincinnati).

John Hankiewicz, Fruit I, 2016, etching and chine colle

January 16 – February 24

Reception: Thursday, January 19, 6 – 8 pm.

Works on Paper is a juried exhibition for artists living within a 40-mile radius of Dayton, Ohio.

This year, 91 artists from Dayton and the surrounding areas submitted 237 pieces, from which the juror, Elizabeth Carney, Assistant Curator at the Akron Art Museum, chose 40 artworks, representing 35 artists.

Carney wrote, “Paper is a varied and beautiful material with a long history. The artworks in this year’s ‘Works on Paper’ exhibition each communicate an intentional and studied approach to not only image-making, but also object-making. We think of paper as two-dimensional, but it in fact has depth and texture, no matter how fine. The selected artists make use of the nuances of their papers of choice, having crafting cohesive artworks with unique voices.”

Carney also selected the winners of the United Art and Education Awards, totaling $1,100. Award winners are:

First Place: John Hankiewicz, Fruit 1

Second Place: Michele BonDurant, Exposed to Loneliness

Third Place: Doug McLarty, Dragon

Honorable Mentions: Sean Wilkinson, Library #13; Molly Christian, Pouty Girl

Participating artists include Amy Kollar Anderson, Pat Antonick, Michele BonDurant, Matthew R. Burgy, Bruce Campbell, Molly Christian, Joseph Chunko, Dan Cleary, Mary F. Clifford, Clara Coleman, Dorothea A. Crowley, Douglas R. Fiely, Ron Geibert, Kyleen Greene, John Hankiewicz, Dan Hayes, Katie Heine, Kelly Joslin, Sydney Joslin-Knapp, Tim Langenderfer, Doug McLarty, Betty Murray, Jaime Pacheco, Daniel Powers, Heather Lea Reid, Pat Robinow, Billy Simms, Erin Smith-Glenn, Andrea Starkey, Edward Steffanni, Doug Taylor, Stephanie Tyson, Mary Beth Whitley, Sean Wilkinson, and Margaret E. Wittmer.

2016 Exhibitions

Meghan Dillon, Independent Replication, 2016, dye and thread on muslin

November 28 – December 30, 2016

Reception: Saturday, December 3, 11am-3pm, in conjunction with A Rosewood Holiday Arts Festival.

Art Ed began in 2011 at Rosewood Gallery as a way to celebrate our local art educators.  The 49 participants in this year’s exhibition are current or retired art teachers in Dayton and the surrounding areas.

Participating artists: Susan Bennett, Peter Berwald, Beth Bickert-Fensel, Michael Bonilla, Patricia Boone, Cynthia Bornhorst-Winslow, R. Darden Bradshaw, David Brand, Matthew Burgy, Maria Cleary, Clara Coleman, Andrew F. Dailey, Dwayne M. Daniel, Greg Dearth, Meghan Dillon, Rhonda Duncalf, Mark Echtner, Mitchell Eismont, Sarah Fisher, Sharon Govender, Sam Grillmeier, Lindsay Gustafson, Leesa Haapapuro, Shirley Harbaugh, Rosie Huart, Sam Kelly, H. David Kirchner, Christine Klinger, Mary Baker Koch, Paula Willmot Kraus, Tim Langenderfer, April Lemaster, Diane M. Mitchel, Penny Park, Sandra Picciano-Brand, Loretta Puncer, Heather Lea Reid, Francis Schanberger, Rose Schultz, Gail Sells, Erin Smith-Glenn, Barb Stork, Sally A. Struthers, Alice Bordenkircher Tavani, Joanne Von Sossan, Wendy Wagener-Harris, Leonard Williams, Sharon Williams, and Brian Zimerle.

Visitors to A Rosewood Holiday Arts Festival on Saturday, December 3 voted for their favorite works of art on display. The three top vote-getters and winners of $100 awards were:

Francis Schanberger for Kept Slipping
Lindsay Gustafson for To the Moon
Patricia Boone for Immersion

Stephen Goettsch, Twilight

October 17 – November 18, 2016

Reception: Thursday, October 20, 6 – 8pm

Stephen Goettsch, Twilight’s Gentle Embrace, bronze and Brazilian rosewood bayberry and ziricote inlay on sycamore woven lid basket.

Sculptor Stephen Goettsch of Hamilton will exhibit a collection of hand-woven baskets in an exhibition entitled Beyond Tradition: The Art of Nantucket Baskets. Goettsch incorporates various metal and ceramic mediums and sculpting techniques into the very traditional Nantucket basket weaving methods to achieve his singular style.

“One of the things I try to do is help people see the beauty of wood,” Goettsch says of his work. “I work to bring out the beauty that is in these woods whether plain or exotic, while changing them as little as possible.”

Terry Glass, Route 66 Diner Stools, 2011, photograph, 16 x 20 in.

October 17 – November 18, 2016

Reception: Thursday, October 20, 6 – 8pm

Photographer Terry Glass of Tipp City is exhibiting a series of photographs entitled Route 66: An Artistic Journey. Inspired by The Mother Road, a book by Michael Wallis, Glass made this body of work during two separate trips to the iconic former highway in 2011 and 2012.

“After the road was decommissioned as a Federal Highway in 1985, there developed an interest by many in the nostalgic aspect of ‘the Main Street of America.’ This gave me the idea of travelling all 2448 miles and documenting some of the famous places enjoyed by so many people over the years,” Glass said, regarding his interest in the project. “By averaging 100 miles a day this allowed myself to enjoy the history, talk to people, and photograph.”

Having retired from a career in engineering, sales, and marketing communications in the electric motor industry, Glass now pursues his life-long interest in photography for leisure. He works primarily in black and white and alternative processes.

Mary Skrenta, Eulogia, 2016, spray foam insulation, liquid gold leaf, paint, pig intestine.

August 29 – October 7, 2016

Reception: Thursday, September 1, 6 – 8pm

HWD  (Height x Width x Depth), a juried exhibition for sculpture artists in Ohio and surrounding states, is the area’s only gallery exhibition devoted exclusively to sculpture. The exhibition runs from August 29 through October 7, 2016.  There will be an opening reception on Thursday, September 1 from 6 – 8pm with an awards presentation at 7pm.  Both the reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.

This year, 34 artists submitted 83 pieces, from which the juror, Geoff Riggle, chose 20 artworks representing 16 artists. Riggle also selected the winners of five awards, totaling $1,100.

Participating artists include Katie Adams, Cynthia Bornhorst-Winslow, Kathy Burden, Matthew R. Burgy, Pamela L. Deaton, Dana Goodman, Eric Hamlin, Doug Harlow, Michael B. Hays, David Kenworthy, Arthur Kettner, Joe Lauricella, Alice Robrish, Mary Skrenta, Alice Bordenkircher Tavani, and Charlotte Wachtel.

Hours for the exhibition are Monday through Thursday, 9am – 9pm; Friday, 9am – 6pm; and Saturday, 9am – 3pm. Rosewood Gallery is sponsored by the City of Kettering Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Department, with support from the Kettering Arts Council and the Ohio Arts Council. The Gallery is located in the Rosewood Arts Centre, 2655 Olson Drive in Kettering.  For more information, call (937) 296-0294 or visit our website: playkettering.org/gallery.

Award Winners

First Place: Mary Skrenta (Hebron, OH); Eulogia; 2016; spray foam insulation, liquid gold leaf, paint, pig intestine; dimensions vary.

Second Place: Dana Goodman (Huntington, IN); 150 Left; 2015; clay, wood, steel, fiber; 70 x 70 x 110 in.

Third Place: Joe Lauricella (Springfield, OH); Light Torso; 2016; steel rod, steel wire, patina; 50 x 55 x 40 in.

Honorable Mention: Doug Harlow (Centerville, OH), May Something 1962, 2016, ceramic, 4.5 x 5.5 x 4.5 in.

Honorable Mention: Cynthia Bornhorst-Winslow (Beavercreek, OH), Until Death Do We Part?, 2013, ceramic with hand-colored decals, 10.5 x 6 x 6 in.

2016 Juror

Geoff Riggle received a Bachelor of Science in Art Education from Ball State University and a Master of Fine Arts in metalsmithing and jewelry design from Miami University. With a firm foundation in traditional metalsmithing techniques and jewelry design practice, his current body of work spans the mediums of metals and jewelry, sculpture, and photography, and forges ground into digital design and practice. Riggle has exhibited nationally and internationally and has been featured in a number of publications, including Showcase 500 Rings: New Directions in Art Jewelry (2012) by Marthe Le Van. Currently, Riggle is Head of Jewelry Design and Metalsmithing in the Department of Art at Miami University.

Juror Statement:

“In the mid-late 1980s, long before I embarked on the path to my creative profession, I visited the Indianapolis Museum of Art on a day trip with my mother.  I remember entering a dimly lit gallery space. As my eyes adjusted to the darkened environment, I saw a large, ominous, rectilinear shape on the opposing wall. I approached the contrasting value plane while my eyes continued to try to resolve what was before me. As I neared my destination, I crossed an undefined threshold. Abruptly, the shape in front of me evolved, transforming into an expansive space beyond its perimeter. In that split second, I was mystified, subtly disoriented, yet curious and thirsty for more. This experience is my first recollection of the seductive wonderment that occurs when hit with the glut of transient ideas surrounding the form and space a sculptor defines. Nearly two decades later, in art school, I realized James Turrell took me for that ride with Acton, an early iteration of his space division construction series.

“Similarly, each of the works in HWD 2016 exhibits a seductive fragmentary order that adds to its allurement. From the whimsical landscape of Pamela Deaton that shows a distinct feeling for materials coupled with a speculative approach, to David Kenworthy’s coy use of black humor while referencing the rich history of folk art traditions, this exhibition mirrors the contemporary scene through the manipulation, arrangement and scale of forms while simultaneously navigating their inherent content. By challenging preconceptions and fostering viewer exploration, this robust body of work proves the value of creative objects has not been lost contemporarily. I extend my sincerest appreciation and reverence to all the artists who supported this exhibition with their entries. Additionally, I express my sincerest thank you to Tracy Flagg and the dedicated staff of the Rosewood Arts Centre for their invitation to play a part in this juried competition.”

Geoff Riggle

Jeremy Long, Backyard Ithaca, 2008-14, oil on canvas, 72 x 96 in.

July 18 – August 19, 2016

Reception: Thursday, July 21, 6 – 8pm

Painter Jeremy Long, who lives and works in Dayton, will exhibit a collection of oil paintings in an exhibition entitled New Paintings. Long’s highly detailed environments, to which he refers as “spatial worlds,” he says, “can also be thought of as advocating thoughtfulness over excitement, or poetic meaning over novelty.” Of the objective of painting, Long states, “The goal as I see it is to, on one hand, create an ordered, harmonious vision and, on the other hand, to understand that everything seen is relative.”

Long earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from American University in Washington, D.C. He currently serves as Associate Professor of Art and Art History, also at Wright State University.

Stefan Chinov; Untitled; 2014; paper, glue and acrylic paint; 10 x 5 x 5 in.

July 18 – August 19, 2016

Reception: Thursday, July 21, 6 – 8pm

Sculptor Stefan Chinov of Kettering will exhibit a series of sculptures entitled Double Reflection. Regarding his art-making process, Chinov simply states, “[Form strives] to embody the dynamic that is its subject matter.”

Chinov holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas as well as Master of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts degrees from National Academy of the Arts in Sofia, Bulgaria. He currently serves as Associate Professor of Sculpture and Drawing at Wright State University.

22nd Annual The View Juried Landscape Exhibition

Keith Thue, Overlook, 2015, oil and cold wax

May 31 – July 8, 2016

Reception: Thursday, June 2, 6 – 8pm

The View is a juried exhibition for artists living in Ohio and working in all media. This year, 86 artists submitted 241 pieces, from which the juror, Katherine Ryckman Siegwarth, Kettering Exhibition Coordinator and Curatorial Associate at The Dayton Art Institute, chose 40 artworks representing 39 artists. Siegwarth also selected the winners of awards totaling $1,100.

Juror Katherine Ryckman Siegwarth is the Kettering Exhibition Coordinator and Curatorial Associate at The Dayton Art Institute. Prior to The DAI, Siegwarth served as Assistant Director to Zhulong Gallery (Dallas, TX) and was the Luce Curatorial Fellow for the photography department at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art (Fort Worth, TX). She has also worked at the Center for Creative Photography (Tucson, AZ) and the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art. Siegwarth received a Master of Arts in Art History at The University of Arizona, specializing in the history of photography and museum studies.

Siegwarth wrote, “We strive for elegance, a way to seduce the viewer to stay just a moment longer, a moment we hope will take the viewer’s breath away, even for just one fraction of a nanosecond. Such is the life of an artist.”

Participating artists include A. Joseph Barrish, S.M., Jessica Beirise, John Benvenuto, Joletta Breland, Matthew Burgy, Virginia Burroughs, Mary Callaway, Bruce Campbell, Tom Croce, Jane Dippold, Diane Dover, Phillip Erbaugh, Peg Faimon, Douglas R. Fiely, Bill Franz, Stephen Goettsch, Kay Hissong, Kelly Joslin, Craig Lloyd, Richard Malogorski, Whitney Manfreda, Claire Moreland, Walt Murch, Stuart Pearl, Linda Phillips, Alice Robrish, Rose Schultz, Aaron Smith, Ashley Speelman, Jerry Spohr, Andrea Starkey, Sharon Stolzenberger, Barb Stork, Doug Taylor, Keith Thue, Mary Beth Whitley, Leonard Williams, Jim Witmer, and Brian Zimerle.

Siegwarth also selected the winners of awards totaling $1,100:

Best of Show: Alice Robrish of Yellow Springs for her sculpture Vision – Ghost of Matthew Shepard

1st Place: Andrea Starkey of Bellbrook for her woodblock reduction print Snow Day

2nd Place: Brian Zimerle of Oakwood for his ceramic piece titled Rise Like Brume #1

3rd Place: Craig Lloyd of Cincinnati for his painting Row

April 18 – May 20, 2016

Reception: Thursday, April 21, 6 – 8pm

Jason Tanner Young, night time bristles and low beams (detail), 2015, mixed media, 43 x 9.5 x 6 in.

Sculptor Jason Tanner Young of Athens, Ohio will exhibit mixed media sculptures in make/shift. Young’s loosely narrative works, he says, “[ … ] Operate as markers. They tell a loose story, but function more as a description of an environment, an attitude or perception. [ … ] The work presented is composed of raw beliefs and curious fixations.  These truths open memories and start a stumbling internal dialogue.  Stories and lived events surface in the form of objects and installations.”

Young earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from The University of Texas at Tyler. He currently serves as an instructor at Ohio University in Athens, teaching various courses both in sculpture and foundations in art.

Bridgette Bogle, Ruffians, 2014, oil and mixed media on canvas, 10 x 46 in.

April 18 – May 20, 2016

Reception: Thursday, April 21, 6 – 8pm

Painter Bridgette Bogle, who lives and works in Dayton, is exhibiting a series of mixed media paintings entitled Piecemeal. “This body of work was born out of my need to gather my failed pieces, examine them closely and find a way to reuse and remix them into new arrangements,” Bogle said of her collection. “Soon it felt necessary to intervene further, tearing, cutting, and exposing the guts of the work or veiling it under a blank mask of canvas. What started as an act of camouflage grew into a game of revelation.”

Bogle holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio as well as a Bachelor of Arts degree from Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. She currently serves as Assistant Professor of Art at Sinclair Community College.

Nathaniel Foley; Yak-28 Firebar; 2013; aluminum, safety wire, field rivets, poplar; 24 x 12 x 15 in.

March 7 – April 8, 2016

Reception: Thursday, March 10, 6 – 8pm

Sculptor Nathaniel Foley of Findlay, Ohio exhibits a collection of his aviation-inspired sculptures. These pieces, he says, make reference to the dichotomy of uses of flight: for travel and for warfare. “This fragile relationship of forms exposes the delicate balance between grace and imminent danger, similar to the fleeting ballet of courting birds or the hostility felt between foes engaged in a dogfight,” Foley said of his work. “Through references to aeronautical form, the sculptures communicate tension and dance in direct opposition of fundamental forces.”

Foley earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics and Sculpture from Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Mi, and a Master of Fine Arts in Sculpture from Miami University in Oxford. He currently serves as an adjunct instructor at Bowling Green State University, Owens Community College, and Defiance College.

Foley also led a workshop on aviation riveting in conjunction with his exhibition at Rosewood Gallery on Saturday, March 12.

John Dickinson, Clever Student, 2015, enamel and screen print ink on newsprint on board, 20 x 14 x 1 in.

March 7 – April 8, 2016

Reception: Thursday, March 10, 6 – 8pm

Painter and sculptor John Dickinson, who lives and works in Dayton, is exhibiting a series of mixed media paintings entitled The Humming Persists. Dickinson’s work uses layers to investigate a notion of art as filter, or vent. “As visual motifs, [the paintings] both reveal and conceal information, and act to filter gesture,” Dickinson said. “Grids underlie most of the pieces, and serve initially to structure the composition, but eventually give way to entropic accumulations of pattern or deviant gestures in the form of marks, bleeds, slits, and tears.”

Dickinson holds bachelor’s degrees in Philosophy and Art from Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado as well as a Master of Fine Arts from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. He currently serves as Assistant Professor of Sculpture at Wright State University.

Michele Bon Durant, Cake Slice Shoreline III, 2015, cut paper, artist tape, oil.

January 18 – February 26, 2016

Reception: Thursday, January 21, 6 – 8pm

Works on Paper is a juried exhibition for artists living within a 40-mile radius of Dayton, Ohio. This year, 102 artists from Dayton and the surrounding areas submitted 272 pieces, from which the juror, Susan Li O’Connor, chose 39 artworks, representing 27 artists.

Juror Susan Li O’Connor was born in Taipei, Taiwan.  Her work deals with the accumulation of everyday objects and the contradictory beauty of those objects as visual eye candy to the destructive quality they have on the environment.  While the transformation of a mundane object is the first thing a viewer sees, O’Connor is also entertaining questions of identity, consumerism and consumption within our culture.

O’Connor teaches at the Columbus School for Girls.  She taught at the Columbus College of Art and Design from 2005-2014. She is a recipient of the Greater Columbus Arts Council (GCAC) 2013 Dresden, Germany Artist in Residency program, has received grants through the GCAC, was a juror for the 2012 Columbus Arts Festival, was board member and programming committee member of the Ohio Art League from 2008-2010.  Her work has been exhibited nationally in Ohio, Colorado, California, North Carolina, Louisiana, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan and Pennsylvania.  She currently lives and works in Columbus, Ohio.

O’Connor wrote, “We strive for elegance, a way to seduce the viewer to stay just a moment longer, a moment we hope will take the viewer’s breath away, even for just one fraction of a nanosecond. Such is the life of an artist.”

O’Connor also selected the winners of the United Art and Education Awards, totaling $1,100.

Participating artists include Nicholaus Arnold, Karen Becker Benedetti, Bridgette Bogle, Carlee Bollin, Michele BonDurant, Kurt Doll, Douglas R. Fiely, Kyleen Greene, Lloyd Greene, Jennifer Haack, Erin Holscher Almazan, Colleen Kelsey, Paula Willmot Kraus, Richard Malogorski, Colleen McCulla, Thom Meyer, Kathy A.  Moore, Alexandra Morrissette, Jaime Pacheco, Amy Powell, Ellen Price, Billy Simms, Andrea Starkey, Sharon Stolzenberger, Frank Travers, Barb Weinert-McBee, and Mary Beth Whitley.

The exhibition runs from January 18 through February 26, 2016.There will be an opening reception on Thursday, January 21 from 6-8pm with a United Art and Education Awards presentation at 7pm.  Both the reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.

AWARDS:

BEST OF SHOW: Erin Holscher Almazan, #3 from the series Letdown

FIRST PLACE: Kathy A. Moore, Self Portrait Drawing Still Life

SECOND PLACE: Michele BonDurant, Cake Slice Shoreline III

THIRD PLACE: Amy Powell, There is no danger here.

HONORABLE MENTION: Kurt Doll, Wright #11

HONORABLE MENTION: Paula Willmot Kraus, 3 and 20

2015 Exhibitions

Diane Mitchel, My Very Very Very Brief History of Art, 2015, acrylic.

October 26 – December 31

Reception: December 5, 11am – 3pm

Art Ed began in 2011 at the Rosewood Gallery as a way to celebrate our local art educators.  All 46 participants in the Art Ed 2015 exhibition are currently teaching art in Dayton and the surrounding areas.

Participating artists: Stephanie Beiser, Susan Bennett, Bridgette Bogle, Michael Bonilla, Cynthia Bornhorst-Winslow, R. Darden Bradshaw, Matthew R. Burgy, Tricia Calvert, Ed Charney, Bob Coates, Andrew Dailey, Gregory M. Dearth, Scott Dooley, Mark Echtner, Mitchell Eismont, Aaron Gosser, Sam Grillmeier, Lindsay Gustafson, Leesa Haapapuro, Aubrey Hackett, Shirley Harbaugh, Sara Hawkins, Kelly Joslin, Richard Jurus, Tom Kinarney, Janet Olney Lasley, Annie Lee-Zimerle, Joshua Merritt, Diane M. Mitchel, Kristin Mitchell, Kathy A. Moore, Penny Park, Roxann Patrick, Katrina Pierce, Amy Powell, Crispin Prebys, Wil Rowland Jr., Francis Schanberger, Billy Simms, Barb Stork, Sally A. Struthers, Peggy Trimble, Joanne Von Sossan, Leonard Williams, Sharon Williams, and Brian Zimerle.

Attendees at the A Rosewood Holiday Arts Festival selected three People’s Choice Award winners. First Place: Leesa Haapapuro for Enchanted Garden; Second Place: Tom Kinarney for On the Prowl; Third Place: Lindsay Gustafson for Triforce.

September 21 – October 16

Reception: September 20, 2 – 4pm

 

Sculptor and architect Terry Welker, who lives and works in Kettering, exhibits an experiential installation of kinetic and interactive sculpture entitled The Consent.

Artist Statement:

Making mobiles comes from my passion for architecture, poetic space and meaningful places. Building on the tradition of Alexander Calder, I work to understand and extend the language of mobiles by animating form, space and surface with motion.

Working with abstractions, without the constraints of literal interpretation, many of my forms come from my memory of a shape rather than direct adaptation. I also see the process of creation as an intentional act of making that comes from experimentation, trial and error letting form come from the nature of materials and tools. Seeking simplicity and elegant strength in every composition, I use curves, arcs and lines as a continuous sub-theme as if to draw in three dimensions.

The unique character of mobiles reveals the inherent challenge of gravity and the mystery of delicate balance. By pushing the limits of form and space with these forces I work to orchestrate “near misses” and “soft collisions.” The unpredictable and accidental nature of these movements allows the observer to move beyond simple viewing and become unconsciously engaged in the enjoyable act of watching.

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

Making kinetic art depends on gravity and dynamic forces. Mathematically predictable but impractical from a creative standpoint, so I do very little drawing and simply model in three dimensions as quickly as possible. It’s a lot more efficient to use my intuition with a trial & error process. Drawing is used as a recording process.

Experimentation is also a cornerstone of my work. I’m always surveying for new materials, tools and processes. These eventually work their way into new works and new series.

Lastly, I’m an architect so my passion for placemaking is central to my thesis.

What influences your work or your creative process?

I’m intrigued with memory, archetypal forms, symbols and dreams. I also consider myself a formalist infatuated with color but this stems from my memory of form and color more than direct adaptation.  I try to be an astute observer of nature as an essential origin of form and color so I can recall them as potential quasi-symbols. In the end my aim is to create work and places that enable people to “get lost” in their observation, daydream and “be in the moment of staring” or evoke a memory.

I have to admit that I’m more influenced by things outside of the art world than inside it. Family, friends, music, poetry, pop culture and especially the natural world.  Ideas don’t usually come from staring at or commenting on art but from things outside of it.

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

Anyone making a mobile owes a debt to Alexander Calder. While there are plenty of books on Calder and museums with his work there is little about his process and techniques of construction so that must be learned the hard way: observation. I appreciate that his work bridges from figurative, fun toys to large abstract public art. 

These are personal preferences but I study the color and forms of a number of 20th Century painters and sculptors: Joseph Albers, Klimt, Donald Judd, John Chamberlain, Richard Serra, George Rickey, Harry Bertoia, Louise Nevelson, Alberto Giocometti, Franz Kline, Henry Moore, Brancusi to name a few but I’m also drawn to more contemporary sculpture of artists like Sarah Sze. Architecturally, I still study architects such as Kahn, Corbusier, McIntosh, Gaudi, Scarpa and Aalto.

September 21 – October 16

Reception: September 20, 2 – 4pm

Artist Nikos Fyodor Rutkowski of Columbus exhibits Infinite Loop, an abstract, mixed media painting installation.

Artist Statement:

Life can lead us on wild tangents: our lives are a cumulative history of strange paths taken, tangled and interwoven relations. Couplings, relationships, uncouplings; people come into our lives and affect us in some way, and then disappear as suddenly as they arrived sometimes. Outside stimulus, new knowledge and scientific discoveries creep in and act upon our lives and understanding of our world. Addictions, afflictions, interests are all cultivated and developed. Our lives, no matter how individual and unique, echo the lives of others. Our cycles as individuals echo other cycles. Narrative structure. Evolution. Development of styles, fads. Everything cycles through.

The birth of my son near the end of 2013 has profoundly affected my thinking on life and art. He has prompted me to think deeply about my own life, my evolution as a person and as an artist. His arrival has made me ponder my place in a continuum in a way that I never had before. As an artist, as a painter, there had always been a burden of awareness hovering over me, a burden of concern over the relevance of what I’m doing and whether it fits a narrative of art history or not. And that has been mostly supplanted by thinking of issues outside of art. It has pushed down aesthetic thinking into a more intuitive mode for me.

After what I can only describe as an unintentional hiatus from painting for a couple of years, I made the decision to make the largest painting of my career. By my way of thinking it’s not so much ambitious as absolutely needed. The outlet had been stopped up for so long that I needed the maximum amount of space possible to unleash everything that had been building up.

I’ve pinned this work upon the bones of two overlapping concepts. The first is the concept of a cyclical, repeating movement: the painting loops back upon itself and does not have a beginning nor an end. The second is the concept of an abstract work functioning as a narrative. To that end I have tried to   find visual evocations of story structure, the phases of a life, the stages of a style: birth, life, and death equivalencies. And then rebirth, or continuation.

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

My approach to creating art is based in a revelation that I had as a much younger man: that for me all materials and mediums are equal, and that nothing should be off the table as far as what to use. No material should be treated as if it were precious. I believe in an equality of materials. A cheap restaurant crayon for kids making marks on the back of a place mat should be used with the same attitude as gold leaf and fine Dutch oil paints on linen. This has also led to a respect for materials and their capabilities, and a better understanding of what they can and cannot do. I also tend to incorporate “craft ghetto” materials like glitter, glow in the dark paint, and day-glow colors into my work.

My process involves never relying on sketches or preliminary studies because in my mind those are their own unique art pieces. I also find there to be a huge disconnect in trying to reproduce something from, say, a hard medium like graphite to a more fluid medium like paint; something is always lost in translation.

Because of my view of medium equality and “medium specificity” my paintings are very layered, filled with erasures, overlays, washes, and other collage and painting techniques. What many artists would rectify in sketches or studies ahead of time, I do on the surface of the finished piece.

I would not call myself a formalist, but it is the easiest point of access to my work. Aesthetic issues are always of the foremost consideration in my paintings.

What influences your work or your creative process?

As an artist in my mid-thirties it’s hard to exactly pinpoint my influences; however I hate to adopt a pose that I’m “beyond influences.” There are always those exhibits that shock your senses and make you rethink the work that you’re making, and make you consider for a moment mimicking their work. In the past decade or so I’ve had this experience in front of work by Julie Mehretu, Lee Bonteco  and Mark Bradford specifically.

My earliest artistic influences would be Robert Rauschenberg, Willem de Kooning, Eva Hesse, Dieter Roth, and others (as an avid Art History aficionado I could keep going forever).

The biggest influence on my work beyond other artists is life itself. Having a very young son has opened me up to thinking about art in ways that I never would have before, and has allowed me to see with a new set of eyes.

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

The most important lesson I’ve learned from other artists is just how toxic most art supplies really are, and how to use them in a less brazenly reckless way than I did in my youth. Understanding the hazards that you’re exposing yourself to is profoundly profane.

Carol Boram-Hays
Carol Boram-Hays, Medulla, 2011, cast concrete, reclaimed metal, pigments

August 10 – September 11

Reception: August 23, 2 – 4pm

About HWD

HWD (Height x Width x Depth), a juried exhibition for sculpture artists in Ohio and surrounding states, is the area’s only gallery exhibition devoted exclusively to sculpture. This year, 31 artists submitted 77 pieces, from which the juror, curator Steven Matijcio, chose 24 artworks representing 22 artists.

Matijcio wrote: “There is certainly no shortage of excess amongst a privileged class where money is no object, but this is a rarefied realm that most often perpetuates the same economic models that jettison all that which does not produce profit in the most immediate, aerodynamic way. The work in HWD alternately twists, warps, folds, skews and transforms – evidencing and amplifying its quintessentially human manufacture.”

Matijcio also selected the winners of the United Art and Education Awards, totaling $1,100 (to be announced during the artist reception).

Participating artists include Carol Boram-Hays, Cynthia Bornhorst-Winslow, Matthew R. Burgy, Rebecca Carpenter, Nicole Crock, Pamela L. Deaton, Mandy Goodwin, Jackie Holan, Ron Hundt, Sarah Hydell, Janet Kelman, Virginia Kistler, Irina Koukhanova, Carrie Longley, Carol McDonough, Rob Millard-Mendez, Matthew Obrebski, Elizabeth Runyon, Gary Schmitt, Chuck Sharbaugh, Aaron Smith, and Jason Tanner Young.

2015 Juror

Steven Matijcio is the curator of the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. Prior to this position he served as Curator of Contemporary Art at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Matijcio is a graduate of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, New York and has held positions in a number of important galleries and museums including the Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art, the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the National Gallery of Canada.

Matijcio was honored in 2010 with a prestigious Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award for his project paperless. In the summer of 2011 he was chosen from an international pool of candidates to participate in curatorial residencies in Gwangju, South Korea (as part of the Gwangju Design Biennale) and Berlin, Germany (as part of the Haus der Kulturen der Welt’s SYNAPSE project exploring the relationship between art & science). In the fall of 2012 he curated the 4th edition of the Narracje Festival in Gdansk, Poland, which involved a city-wide program of installations, interventions and video projections upon the surfaces of historic buildings. Matijcio’s 2013 essay “Nothing to See Here: The Denial of Vision in Media Art” was accepted into the RENEW: Media Art Histories Conference in Riga, Latvia.

Matijcio has also lectured on theory and criticism at the University of Manitoba, written for numerous catalogues and journals (including the Guide to the 27th Sao Paulo Bienal), and was commissioned in 2003 by the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation to curate one of their first online exhibitions.

Juror Statement:

“In the accelerating era of so-called digital evolution, sculpture has never seemed more antiquated. When progress is equated with shedding physical baggage (and being) in favor of a weightless virtual existence in an amorphous, yet omnipresent cloud, what purpose is to be served by material objects that fulfill no practical function other than to be? And yet it is precisely in, and of this exile that makes work like that which we see in this year’s HWD all the more timely and necessary. Rather than succumbing to a societal pressure to streamline and minimize, these artists embrace a neo-baroque approach to making that revels in ornamentation, excess, melodrama and materiality. To do so is contrarian to the times and crucial to the psychological well-being of a populace too often corralled into thinking only about a future existence at the expense of reflection; reversing the “inefficiency” of taking time to look back over one’s shoulder and linger in the mutations of memory. There is certainly no shortage of excess amongst a privileged class where money is no object, but this is a rarefied realm that most often perpetuates the same economic models that jettison all that which does not produce profit in the most immediate, aerodynamic way. The work in HWD alternately twists, warps, folds, skews and transforms – evidencing and amplifying its quintessentially human manufacture. Aaron Smith is especially, and intriguingly iconoclastic in his acts of metamorphosis – turning tired objects like a prayer bench and player piano into a guitar and birdcage respectively. In concert with Smith’s instrumental reassignment, Jason Tanner Young conducts a more lyrical and at times macho manipulation of wood and structure – bending the history and integrity of wood into enigmatic riddles. Chuck Sharbaugh’s treatment of wood is ostensibly more reverent upon first approach, but while he maintains an ecumenical grace to his material and craft his subject matter upon the tabletop suggests a more mysterious, somewhat disorienting flight. Artists Carol Boram-Hays and Sarah Hydell further elaborate the nascent theatricality that informs much of this work and their fellow artists in HWD, moving between post-industrial mutation and ceramic puppetry to suggest an unstable identity in the midst of re-formation. As a whole, HWD assembles work that grants its viewer permission to get lost in these knots, tangles and meanderings of uncertainty. It is not about spotless problem solving or providing direction, but rather about the delight of getting lost and rediscovering what we left behind too soon.”

-Steven Matijcio

Award Winners

First Place: Aaron Smith (Nelsonville, OH); Psychometry 2: Vibes, Essence Spirit; 2014; brads, staples, dove, glue, prayer bench; 28 x 24 x 24 in.

Second Place: Jason Tanner Young (Athens, OH); Up on Plane; 2014; wood, steel, copper; 51 x 54 x 30 in.

Third Place: Chuck Sharbaugh (Holly, MI), Pale Male Soaring, 2015, solid Sapele wood/assorted veneers, 32 x 36 x 36 in.

Honorable Mention: Carol Boram-Hays (Columbus, OH); Medulla; 2011; cast concrete, reclaimed metal, pigments; 47 x 48 x 48 in.

Honorable Mention: Sarah Hydell (Centerville, OH), Hidden Identity, 2015, pottery, 12 x 5 x 4.5 in.

June 29 – July 24

Reception: June 28, 2 – 4pm

Painter Stephanie McGuinness of Englewood shares Recent Works, a series that explores how life events in the outside world become apparent in the domestic landscape.

Artist Statement:

I have long been interested in how life events physically manifest themselves within the realm of private spaces. Collecting discarded notes and lists found in public spaces has granted me limited access to intimate and honest moments of strangers’ lives. Using these found documents I create narratives told through the environments of a house. In a similar way to how I find the documents, viewers are granted access to personal spaces, but hover slightly outside of the frame, unconnected to its inhabitants. The surface of the paint is rough and sometimes transparent to signify the painting process itself, as well as to reflect on how rooms leave traces of their past as they continue to evolve.

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

For years I have been collecting discarded papers found in public spaces, often lists or notes documenting a large range of emotion and experiences. Using these handwritten documents, I begin creating a narrative in which I explore who I think the authors are and how they live. My process begins with writing, then evolves into drawing on paper, and finally accumulates on canvas with the finished piece.

What influences your work or your creative process?

It is hard to separate anything in my life from my creative process. While I am working, music is often too distracting for me, but I have found that listening to NPR or streaming television shows creates an appropriate level of distraction. Those environmental influences, along with books I am reading, tend to find their way into my work.

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

Reg­ardless of medium, the lesson is always that you have to continue to make work—lots of work, your entire life. I look to writers, musicians, and other creative individuals for insights into the creative process. After the cardinal rule of constant work, I have also learned that artists have to work through “bad” work until they can get to the succesful work. While this is often hard and not the most relaxing way to spend one’s time, I believe that pushing through those rough periods is what makes someone not only create successful work, but develops them into a true artist.

June 29 – July 24

Reception: June 28, 2 – 4pm

Collage artist Tiffany Clark, who lives and works in Dayton, exhibits a series of ink and paper collages entitled Bonding. Clark’s work aims to investigate the physiology related to emotional experiences. Clark currently serves as an instructor at Decoy Arts Studio.

Artist Statement:

My work is inspired by both common and personal stories of the human experience such as lust, addiction, love, and grief. I illustrate moments in our lives and the neurochemicals released, hopefully gaining a greater understanding of the science behind our most potent emotions. Using my unique collage style, inspired by my love for chin-colé monoprints and sketching, my images become a surrealistic mix of illustration and anatomy art.

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

I try to keep the confident quick line quality of my original sketches. Often using my original sketch as a template,  I strategically cut and glue different tones and textures of papers with an almost sculptural approach. Keeping with the desire to translate the feeling of a sketchbook into a finished piece, I draw over the collage paper using pen and ink.

What influences your work or your creative process?

My work is heavily influenced by my own life experiences and the desire to share those moments or understandings with others. Music is the primary influence in my creative process. I not only use lyrics as titles or visual inspiration for my work,  but I use specific styles of music while cutting, gluing, and sketching to create an energy specific to each process.

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

A seemingly endless list of things I’ve learned from other artists would range from techniques to life metaphors. The artists I love and respect the most haven’t just taught but have shown me the beauty and trials of living as an artist. Sleepless nights are a privilege and joy in order to fulfill our responsibility to create as much work as possible while we have time and inspiration.

Martin L. Hunter, Serpentine Path (detail), 2013, acrylic.

May 18 – June 19

Reception: May 17, 2 – 4pm

The View is a juried exhibition for artists living in Ohio and working in all media. This year, 108 artists submitted 317 pieces, from which the juror, Kristin Spangenberg, Curator of Prints and Photographs at the Cincinnati Art Museum, chose 53 artworks representing 42 artists.

 

Spangenberg has more than 40 years of experience in her field, having previously served as Assistant Curator of Prints at the Cincinnati Art Museum and Assistant Curator of Graphic Arts at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Ms. Spangenberg earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Davis, and a master’s degree from the University of Michigan. She also served an internship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Print & Photograph Department and has participated in various seminars. She is a member of the Print Council of America and the Circus Historical Society. Ms. Spangenberg has lectured on many topics, including recent lectures on Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Pablo Picasso, and Frank Duveneck. She has also written catalogues for many of the Art Museum’s exhibitions on prints, drawings and photographs. Most recently she has contributed to and edited The Amazing American Circus Poster: The Strobridge Lithographing Company (2011).

Participating artists include Rosemarie Bloch, Michele BonDurant, Arlene Branick, Michelle Burdine, Virginia Burroughs, Mary Callaway, Bruce Campbell, Tom Croce, Jane Dippold, Gina Duncan, Peg Faimon, Bill Franz, Pam Geisel, Jack Givens, Terry Glass, Lloyd Greene, Jim Hayes, Martin L. Hunter, William Jacobs, Danielle James, Amanda Kiplinger, Christine Klinger, Mary Baker Koch, Christine Landis, John Lemker, S.M., Terri Maloney-Houston, Sherrill E. Massey, Thom Meyer, Tom Millward, Chris Noah, Jan Noden, Lorraine Parmelee, Stuart Pearl, Linda Phillips, Ann L. Rebele, Carroll M. Schleppi, Sherraid Scott, Andrea Starkey, Walter Strubczewski, Kim Vito, Barb Weinert-McBee, and Leonard Williams.

Spangenberg also selected the winners of six awards, totaling $1,100:

Best of Show: Terry Maloney-Houston (Columbus), Leaf Ring, 2014-15, porcelain.

First Place: Chris Noah (Miamisburg), Poppy Field, 2015, alcohol paint.

Second Place: Martin L. Hunter (Centerville), Serpentine Path, 2013, acrylic.

Third Place: Bill Franz (Dayton), Evangelical Cornfield, 2011, photograph.

Honorable Mention: Pam Geisel (Yellow Springs), Sunflowers at Whitehall Farm, 2013, quilted fiber.

Honorable Mention: Andrea Starkey (Bellbrook), Tree No. 27, 2014, woodblock reduction print.

April 13 – May 8

Reception: April 12, 2 – 4pm

Mixed media sculptor Landon Crowell of Kettering will exhibit his collection titled Constructed Landscapes. Crowell holds a BFA in Sculpture from Wright State University. He currently holds positions as Adjunct Sculpture Instructor and Gallery Technician at Wright State University.

Artist Statement:

I have spent most of my life fascinated by the natural environment, taking odd jobs such as construction and factory work so I could spend my summers as a mountain guide in Yosemite national park, or the wilds of New Mexico. My “Constructed Landscape” series stems from those odd jobs, places I would explore, and even the airplane rides over the countryside getting to my adventure destinations.

In my “constructed Landscapes” series, I am working with basic construction materials: driveway sealer, plywood, construction chalk, hose clamps, wood, and adding natural materials such as bee’s wax and branches. This body of work is a series of mixed media low reliefs, sculptures, and installations based off of the natural world. Some imagery comes from aerial views, map-making symbols, and the landscape itself. This work deals with such themes as memory, landscape, and the interaction we as humans have with the natural world. The work is meant to be stark and in some cases even feel un-finished. This is to create an inner tension between the art work and the viewer. The inner tension is meant to relate to the tension between human kind and the spaces we alter in the landscapes we occupy.

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

I think my process is unique in that I am always pushing my materials in ways most people don’t think about. I use beeswax and driveway sealer together to create paintings and reliefs, and push the idea of basic construction materials slightly out of the world of construction and into ideas based off of landscapes. With very minimal alteration to the material itself, the materials come almost full circle. They come from the land and in a sense by turning them into landscapes, they return to a sense of their former state. I also am very conscience of the materials look and feel, I find the utmost beauty in that when I’m working.

I would say it defines my practice by having to be methodical, and sure of the direction I take with the materials, I Always keep in mind how the materials will shape or look when finished. I try to respect the material, and allow a symbiotic relationship to emerge between my direction and its inherent properties.

What influences your work or your creative process?

I would say the materials I use, my process and my love of the outdoors and the southwestern United States.

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

I would say one of the biggest lessons I have learned is that to let the materials speak on it’s own terms. If I have a piece of warped wood let that warp guide me, use the warp to my advantage, and make that warp a highlight of the work.

Artwork by Sophia Maras

Found object sculptor Sophia Maras explores the use of recycled materials and common objects in a form of mixed media artwork. With this body of work, she hopes to create pieces that will challenge people to see a beauty in objects either over-used or over-looked. Maras grew up in Louisiana where she explored a multitude of creative avenues and developed a love for order and patterns in her daily activities, which she now applies to her artistic practice.

Artist Statement:

With this found-object-based body of work, I am striving to bring attention to the beauty in the used, neglected, or insignificant objects in our world. My work emphasizes the subtle aspects of these items by incorporating large numbers of them into a unifying whole. Arranging materials such as paper, screws, or plastic grocery sacks in a deliberate, yet unnatural order presents viewers with an opportunity to investigate. These juxtapositions are intended to pull individuals out of their normal realm of thought by giving them a different perspective on the material and perhaps the opportunity to see a new beauty in some of the minute building blocks of our daily lives.

I alter many of the materials through tedious processes such as weaving, wrapping, knotting, or stitching, which places a larger contextual gap between the final piece and the material’s original appearance or purpose. Drawing viewers in with structured arrangements of color or shape, allows me to intrigue from a distance. I am fascinated with the way in which multiples can transform as their numbers increase, thus giving the viewer a range of aesthetic experiences as the they move closer to the work.

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

The uniqueness of my process revolves around my time spent with the material. For some of my work, using methods such as weaving or stitching contribute a key aspect of tenderness to the work. Through repeating these steps several times, I try to meditate on the material and the process, connecting the items original purpose or form to what I hope my viewers will grasp from the final piece. This process results in a practice centered on time, focus and transformation.

What influences your work or your creative process?

The world. There are so many examples multiples around us every day. For years and years I have been amazed at the multitude of waste, recycling, and just plain ‘stuff’. Eventually, I began to transform those things into artwork: first in my mind, then in material. My purpose for this was to create something aesthetically pleasing, so that people could find a beauty in the items they see, use, and discard. Throughout my artistic development, I have discovered inspiring artists such as Vic Muniz and his work from the Wasteland documentary and Tara Donovan’s magnificent use of multiples in her installation work.

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

Production of artwork takes extreme dedication and hard work. Sometimes it can be too easy to stay in the sketching, brainstorming, or thinking stage of a piece. Regardless of life happening around you, it is so important to strictly dedicate time slots for artwork. Treating it in this structured way will force those creative juices to flourish and one’s practice to grow.

This is a hard lesson I have learned from a few artists over the last few years, and it is something I must keep working toward daily. As of recent, I was told to “just create.” No matter  how bad it was, she told me to just make sure I was creating something.

Francis Schanberger
Artwork by Francis Schanberger

January 26 – February 27

Reception: January 25, 2 – 4pm

About Works on Paper

Works on Paper is a juried exhibition for artists living within a 40-mile radius of Dayton, Ohio. This year, 70 artists from Dayton and the surrounding areas submitted 175 pieces, from which the juror, Sean Wilkinson, chose 39 artworks, representing 30 artists.

Wilkinson wrote: “I honor the intent of every artist that submitted work to this show, regardless of the acuity or failure of my ability to apprehend those intents as the artists would have wished. Rewards and rejections are largely irrelevant; neither should be taken too much to heart. All that matters for artists is to keep on doing what we need to do. The risk of attempting something meaningful is its own reward.”

Wilkinson also selected the winners of the United Art and Education Awards, totaling $1,100 (to be announced during the opening reception).

Participating artists include Brent Beck  ·  Bridgette Bogle  ·  Bruce Campbell  ·  Dan Cleary  ·  Bob Coates  ·  Tom Croce  ·  Rhonda Duncalf  ·  Douglas R. Fiely  ·  Jennifer Haack  ·  John Hankiewicz  ·  Rosie Huar  ·  Martin L. Hunter  ·  Lisa Selvia Johnson  ·  Kelly Joslin  ·  Richard Jurus  ·  Colleen Kelsey  ·  Dave Kirkwood  ·  Paula Willmot Kraus  ·  Elizabeth Osweiler Martin  ·  Pete Mitas  ·  Kathy A. Moore  ·  Walt Murch  ·  Tres Roemer  ·  Francis Schanberger  ·  Billy Simms  ·  Leah Stahl  ·  Sharon Stolzenberger  ·  Douglas R. Taylor  ·  Rebecca Tsaloff  ·  Diane Schwob Zubrick.

2015 Juror

Sean Wilkinson had the good fortune to work closely with three of the greatest photographers and teachers of the second half of the twentieth century: Minor White, Harry Callahan, and Aaron Siskind. Upon completing his M.F.A. at the Rhode Island School of Design, he taught at Harvard University before accepting a position in 1973 at the University of Dayton, where he was hired to create a new course of study in photography. Wilkinson has also sustained an active career as a photographer, exhibiting his work in museums and galleries across the country. He has won numerous awards and grants, and his work is in many significant museum, individual, and corporate collections. Wilkinson retired from UD in 2014.

Juror Statement:

“What is art, these days? It has become an increasingly elusive term to define, encompassing as it does all manner of forms, ideas, practices, and purposes. Paper, on the other hand, remains a fundamental ground and medium for a great deal of art making. There is still a deep need to create things to look at, handle, and present to others, not just ideas but their embodiment, things that have their own existence, that can be set loose in the world, borne on this fragile yet enduringly important material.

“The photographer, Arno Rafael Minkkinen, has written: ‘Art is risk made visible.’ I believe this is true not only in the making of good art, but also when the artist seeks to put her work or his work out in the open for others to see. Ideally, a sense of awareness, connection, or illumination occurs in the synaptic transmission between artist and audience. But that is always an uncertain and highly variable matter. In the sending and receiving of signals, something is always lost, or at least altered; the intent and its reception are never entirely congruent.

“I honor the intent of every artist that submitted work to this show, regardless of the acuity or failure of my ability to apprehend those intents as the artists would have wished. Rewards and rejections are largely irrelevant; neither should be taken too much to heart. All that matters for artists is to keep on doing what we need to do. The risk of attempting something meaningful is its own reward.”

Sean Wilkinson

Commenting on his own work, Wilkinson has written:

“I am interested in looking plainly at things that yield more than plain looking is presumed to reveal. The essential thing is to be fully present. Potential material is not hard to find, and in some ways, photography is as easy as it appears to be. The challenge is to see. Like breathing, it seems so simple until you give it your complete attention.”

Award Winners

Wilkinson selected six works to receive awards totaling $1,100 sponsored by United Art and Education:

Best of Show: Colleen Kelsey, Night Letter, 2014, acrylic on paper.

First Place: Francis Schanberger, Barbie Best Buy Nightgown and Lucky Peignoir, 2014, hibiscun anthotype.

Second Place: Bridgette Bogle; Winter Drawing, Descent; 2014; gouache, gesso, and charcoal.

Third Place: Billy Simms, Did I Say Something?, 2014, etching with hand coloring.

Honorable Mention: Dave Kirkwood, Takes a Lickin’, 2014, pen and ink.

Honorable Mention: Brent Beck, chair study II, 2014, acrylic.

2014 Exhibitions

Art EdNovember 10 – December 12

Reception: December 6, 11am-3pm

About Art Ed

Art Ed was created in 2011 by the Rosewood Gallery as an opportunity to showcase the arts faculty at the Rosewood Arts Centre, and for Dayton area art educators to present their work to the community.

This year Art Ed features 38 art instructors, representing 18 Dayton-area educational institutions:

Lisa Becker  ·  Cynthia Bornhorst-Winslow  ·  Matthew Burgy  ·  Terry Chamberlain  ·  Edward Charney  ·  Bob Coates  ·  Andrew Dailey  ·  Meghan Dillon  ·  Mark Echtner  ·  Regina Emery  ·  Aaron Gosser  ·  Shannon Grecula  ·  Sam Grillmeier  ·  Lindsay Gustafson   ·  Leesa Haapapuro   ·  John Hankiewicz   ·  Shirley Harbaugh   ·  Rusty Harden   ·  Kevin Harris   ·  Rosie Huart   ·  Kelly Joslin   ·  Richard Jurus   ·  Colleen Kelsey   ·  Tom Kinarney   ·  Annie Lee-Zimerle   ·  Tess Little   ·  Jeremy Long   ·  C. Pat McClelland   ·  Diane M. Mitchel   ·  Kathy A. Moore   ·  Katrina Pierce   ·  Sarah Rodriguez   ·  Francis Schanberger   ·  Barb Stork   ·  Sally Struthers   ·  Leigh Waltz   ·  Leonard Williams   ·  Paula Willmot Kraus

People’s Choice Award Winners

Viewers voted for their favorite pieces during the reception on Saturday, December 6th in conjunction with A Rosewood Holiday Open House.  478 votes were cast during the event. Three People’s Choice Award winners were announced the following week:

First Place: TIE – Leesa Happapuro, Absent Butterflies AND Rusty Harden, Sylva

Third Place: Matthew Burgy, Thank You, Robin (A Tribute to Robin Williams)

Congratulations to our winners and a big thanks to all who attended this event!

 

October 6 – 31, 2014

Christopher Troutman
Christopher Troutman, “Five Part Story, Recycling,” 2012, charcoal on paper.

Christopher Troutman, who lives and works in Beaumont, TX, will exhibit his charcoal drawings. “I work from imagination, shifting points of view presented in drawings from the memories that initiate them,” he said. “I strive to avoid external references until my ability to visualize a subject fails, after which I use observational sketches and photographs to complete final details.” Troutman’s drawings place the audience in unexpected and sometimes overwhelming spaces, enabling the resonant experiences from which the drawings are inspired to achieve a similar resonance with viewers.

Troutman holds an MFA in Drawing and Painting from California State University, Long Beach and a BFA in Drawing and Painting with a minor in Art History from Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois. He currently serves as Assistant Professor of Art at Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas.

Artist Statement:

In my current body of work, drawing is my primary means of expression.  The immediacy of drawing allows a close connection between mark and thought, as working from imagination is central to my process.  I build content in my work through an interaction with drawing materials, particularly charcoal and sometimes ink, and use mark-making, layering, erasing and smudging, as opposed to selecting a medium offhand at the service of an idea.  As a result, progressive stages of a drawing determine its content: compositionally, I begin with lines and shapes, yet occasionally with a specific subject in mind from previously completed sketches, which suggest figures and environments.  This subject matter interacts to imply narrative and the passage of time, which I enhance by dividing drawings into multiple sections.  Recently, I have used multi-sectioned drawings to examine similarities and differences between my memories of the U.S.’s Midwest and of southern Japan—the two places I reside each year—by juxtaposing visual and spatial features unique to both locations.

My subjects are human figures in contemporary urban settings, whom I enhance by depicting them from unfamiliar points of view, to reveal the value of exploring everyday visual experience in drawing. I work from imagination, shifting points of view presented in drawings from the memories that initiate them. I strive to avoid external references until my ability to visualize a subject fails, after which I use observational sketches and photographs to complete final details. My interests in depicting the passage of time, dynamic space defined by the human figure and linear perspective, and drawing from imagination come from the influence of comic book art—work by Lienil Yu, for example—as well as art examining the figure in urban and domestic settings within active compositions, such as in work by Edgar Degas, Edward Hopper, and Robert Birmelin.

Lastly, my drawings are large-scale and hung unmediated by frames, bringing them into the audience’s immediate space and making the process each drawing has undergone directly visible to viewers.  The scale of the drawings, the figures within them, composition, and point of view place the audience in unexpected and sometimes overwhelming spaces, enabling the resonant experiences from which the drawings are inspired to achieve a similar resonance with viewers.

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

I think two aspects of my work that are unique are the large scale at which I work and the fact that I generally strive to draw from imagination and memory. I prepare ideas by sketching studies from observation and photographs, but I adapt source material to what a composition requires, filling in the gaps of information through invention.  This process is made more challenging by working on a large scale.  These two aspects of my process keep me interested in drawing and coming back to the studio.

What influences your work or your creative process?

My desire to draw from my imagination is influenced by my interest in graphic novels and my idealized mental image of the way comic book artists invent all aspects of their figures and environments.  Dividing images up into multiple sections and suggesting the passage of time between them is also something I take from graphic novels as well as from other artists.  Most of the imagery I work with comes from my personal experiences living with my family in the United States every fall, winter, and spring and living in Japan during the summer months.

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

Robert Birmelin divides continuous spaces or environments into sections and by varying the action taking place between each section he suggests the passage of time.  Varying point of view and focusing on composition is something I’ve taken from Degas’ work as well as comics. The faculty of the figurative track at California State University, Long Beach emphasized composition and the figure in space when I worked on my MFA from 2006 to 2008.

Christopher Troutman (Beaumont, TX), 2014

http://troutman.art.tripod.com

October 6 – 31, 2014

Rachel Clark
Rachel Clark, “Giant Nord,” 2012, oil on panel.

Rachel Clark’s series of oil paintings, The Yearbook Project, is an evolving archive of portraits, cartoons and heads. “If seeing is selection, a process of framing, then I want the face right up to the painting’s edge to amplify its intimacy with all of the fluctuating suggestions of makeup, skin condition, light and shade, using the masklike qualities of the medium,” Clark said. “This perpetually expanding series straddles portraiture and abstracted figuration.”
Clark holds an MFA in Painting and Drawing from the University of Tennessee and a BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Based in Athens, OH, Clark serves as grant writer and Instructor for the Upward Bound Program at Ohio University.

Artist Statement:

The Yearbook Project is an evolving archive of portraits, cartoons, and heads. If seeing is selection, a process of framing, then I want the face right up to the painting’s edge to amplify its intimacy with all of the fluctuating suggestions of makeup, skin condition, light and shade, using the masklike qualities of the medium. This perpetually expanding series straddles portraiture and abstracted figuration. While employing the portrait as a pictorial device, I am interested in how I can be put to new, contemporary uses ideas from historic painting: the preoccupation with the face or window, the complexity and history on our faces, the openly stylized portrayals, and the search through the materials for signs of abstraction to represent the figure in cartoonish extravagant color.

Artist Interview:

What is unique about your process and how does this define your practice?

I set up my studio to facilitate a conversation between works within a set, series, or chapter. These sets of painting can also take a familial resemblance thematically or in terms of the palette.

What influences your work or your creative process?

My relationship with portraiture stems from the photographic archive of the family portrait wall. I tend to present my painted “Yearbook of Portraits” within the context of the grid for a democratizing effect.

Humor influences my work in sometimes direct ways like the painting titled “Hair Baby” and indirect ways like using cartoonish / graphic formal qualities in my painting process. Sometimes I lean toward the historic lineage of smooth painting portraiture and other times I seek to obfuscate a more grotesque expressionism or playfulness of caricature.

What lessons have you learned from other artists?

Artists have similar obstacles to the process of creativity: 1. Momentum vs. inertia; 2. Developing a reverence for the studio practice and appointing time; and 3. Fear and failure. Time + trust in the process = commitment (maybe).

When I was in undergrad one of my teachers told me to read the writings of artists and their biographies. Lately, I have been reading about Philip Guston in his daughter’s book the “Night Studio” and his lectures/conversations.

Rachel Clark (Athens, OH), 2014

http://rachelclark.org

Elizabeth Runyon
Elizabeth Runyon, Rocket, reed and seagrass, 2012.

August 25 – September 26, 2014

Reception:  Sunday, August 24, 2-4pm

About HWD (Height x Width x Depth)

HWD, or Height x Width x Depth, is a juried exhibition of three-dimensional artwork by artists from Ohio and surrounding states.  Established in 2007, HWD is the region’s only gallery exhibition focused exclusively on sculpture.  This year, 48 sculpture artists from Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky submitted 130 pieces, from which the juror chose 30 artworks, representing 27 artists.

The 2014 exhibition features works by the following artists:

Ann Bain  ·  Tyler Bohm  ·  Cynthia Bornhorst-Winslow  ·  Rebecca Carpenter  ·  Bill Danzig  ·  Deb Davis Livaich  ·  Scott Dooley  ·  Patty Emerson  ·  Nathaniel Foley  ·  John Hunting Hansen  ·  Ron Hundt  ·  David Kenworthy  ·  Virginia Kistler  ·  Sarah Krupp  ·  Todd Matteson  ·  Rob Millard-Mendez  ·  Emily Moores  ·  Tybre Newcomer  ·  Cozette Phillips  ·  Elizabeth Runyon  ·  Julia Sebastian  ·  Chuck Sharbaugh  ·  Janet Smith  ·  Jason Tanner Young  ·  Steve Totin  ·  Christy Wittmer  ·  Summer Zickefoose

2014 Juror: Carrie Longley

Carrie Longley is a studio artist and educator. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Fine Art at Indiana University East. She holds a BA in Studio Art from Wittenberg University MFA from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Her artwork investigates the relationship between the art object and scientific specimen, celebrating the space between illusion and reality. She exhibits her work extensively throughout the United States and has received numerous awards including Emerging Craftsman from Ohio Designer Craftsman, The Bobby Kadis Award at the Penland School of Crafts, and the William and Dorothy Yeck Young Sculptor’s Award.

Juror Statement:

“Having exhibited my own work twice before in this exhibition, it was truly an honor to be selected as this year’s juror for the HWD exhibition. I am consistently impressed by the innovation, variety, and incredible skill sets of the HWD artists. The exceptional entries this year made the jurying process an inspiring challenge.

“As is the case with many juried art exhibitions, jurying was completed using digital images of the artwork. As a sculptor, I find it especially difficult to capture the height, width, and depth of my work with digital photography. The featured artists in the exhibition were able to clearly communicate varying degrees of dimension and surface details of their sculptures with digital images alone—a feat in and of itself.

“As a viewer, I’m drawn to works which feature unique combinations of the familiar and imagined. With much of the work, the use of familiar materials or repurposed objects such as wood, steel, ceramics, even shag carpet initially captured my attention, while the imagined aspects encouraged me to further investigate, admire, and wonder.

“I would like to commend and thank the artists for participating in this exhibition. My sincere congratulations to all artists who were able to transform their ideas and materials into innovative works of art.”

Award Winners

Longley selected six works to receive awards totaling $1,100 sponsored by United Art and Education:

First Place: Nathaniel Foley, Three and One Wings, 2011, Baltic birch plywood, cable, drawings, bird bones.

Second Place: Christy Wittmer and Julia Sebastian, there, there, porcelain, plaster, felt, foam.

Third Place: Tyler Bohm, Ur, mixed media on plexiglass.

Honorable Mention: David Kenworthy, Inflated Wood, wood, plaster.

Honorable Mention: Virginia Kistler, Chiaroscuro Columbus, plastic sheeting, steel cable.

Honorable Mention: Janet Smith, Ann Bain, and Ron Hundt, Farm Door, wood, stone, paint, graphite.

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